Carmigo is the Easiest Way to Sell Your Car on the Internet

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Carmigo is the Easiest Way to Sell Your Car on the Internet

Obviously, we're going to say Carmigo is the easiest way to sell your car on the internet, but stick around, and we'll prove why.

List in minutes. Sell in a day. Make more money.

Table of Contents

What’s the Easiest Way to Sell My Car? 

You’re on the Carmigo website. Did you think we were going to say someone else? No. It’s Carmigo. 

Stick around, and we’ll tell you why. 

 

You can do it from anywhere.

Carmigo’s marketplace brings you multiple offers for your car, so you don’t have to drive from dealership to dealership comparing trade-in offers or, worse, get scammed in a private sale. 

Thanks to our virtual inspection technology, our entire process happens on your phone. You can list your car in less than 10 minutes, and we send it out to our entire network of buyers. 

The buyers love it because they don’t have to spend their whole day inspecting cars they don’t want. They can search for the specific cars they need for their lot and make an offer. 

Three Easy Steps

The listing process truly takes less than 10 minutes. All you have to do is snap some pics, answer a few questions, and set your minimum price. 

Our virtual inspection tool will guide you through the process of taking pictures of your car from 12 different angles using your phone’s camera. 

Then you’ll answer a short questionnaire about your vehicle’s features, history, and condition. 

Finally, set your minimum price. If you get an offer on the Carmigo marketplace that meets or beats the price, it sells automatically — no negotiating or haggling required. 

And then we’ll handle the rest. 

Watch the Offers Roll In

Once your listing goes live, buyers will have about one business day to make an offer on your car. Each new offer must be higher than the last, and we’ll send you a message each time a new offer comes in. 

This is where the Carmigo Marketplace shines. Because our marketplace listings expire after a day, there is daily activity. Buyers don’t want to miss out on a listing, so they check back regularly. 

And because the buyers can see their competitors’ offers, a sense of competition over a car can drive more offers. 

At the end of the day, if the highest offer meets or beats your price, the car sells. 

We Handle the Rest

As soon as the sale goes through, we’ll begin paying off your car loan (if you have one) and transfer the remaining balance to your account. 

Our title clerk will ensure the legal transfer of ownership from you (or the bank) to the new buyers. 

We’ll handle any additional paperwork, and we’ll even pick it up.

What Our $350 Fee Includes

For our part, Carmigo charged a $350 flat sell fee. We’ll take the $350 out of the sale proceeds if your car sells before transferring the rest to your bank account. And if your car doesn’t sell, you don’t pay. 

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How to Take Care of Your Car this Winter — 6 Tips

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How to Take Care of Your Car this Winter — 6 Tips

Cold weather can make driving a little trickier, but if you know how to take care of your car this winter, you’ll be in good shape.

Stay safe and keep your car in tip-top shape.

Table of Contents

Cold weather can make driving a little trickier, but if you know how to take care of your car this winter, you’ll be in good shape. 

how to take care of your car this winter, check your battery

1. Check Your Battery

Cold weather causes battery power to decrease, making it a little harder to start and run your car in the winter. Make sure to check your battery and replace one that’s less reliable before the temperatures drop too much. Before cranking your car, you should also turn off the heater, stereo, and other auxiliary gadgets. 

how to take care of your car this winter, check your coolant

2. Care for Your Cooling System

It seems like you wouldn’t need your car’s cooling system during the winter, but you do. And extreme cold can do a real number on it. Make sure to flush the system every two years and maintain a balanced coolant-to-water ratio (which keeps your engine from corroding or freezing).

how to take care of your car this winter, check your breaks

3. Brakes

Cold weather doesn’t so much harm your brakes as it does your braking. It’s harder to brake in cold weather, partially because the roads are often icy and partly because the colder temperatures make the brake pads harder. So it’s crucial those brake pads are in good working condition. 

how to take care of your car this winter, air your tires

4. Maintain Manufacturer Recommended Tire Pressure

When air gets hot, it expands. When it gets cold, it contracts. That means you need more air in your tires during the winter to maintain the same pressure. Too little air means extra wear and tear on your tires that can lead to blowouts. Check the inside of your driver-side door for the recommended tire pressure or the after-market manufacturer. 

5. Pack a Winter Safety Kit and Top Off Your Gas

This applies to most places in the US, but especially in northern states: winter weather increases the chances of being stranded in a vehicle. Before the weather begins its plunge toward zero, pack a winter emergency bag. This should include a blanket, gloves, an auxiliary battery/charger, a small snow shovel, water, an ice scraper, a flashlight, jumper cables, non-perishable snacks, a tire replacement kit, a first aid kit (which you should already have), and kitty litter. 

Also, keep your gas tank over halfway full and your EV batteries charged as much as possible. If you are stranded in your vehicle, having a full tank and a full battery will increase the time you can remain safe and comfortable while waiting for help to arrive or while working to resolve the problem yourself. 

how to take care of your car this winter, practice carseat safety

6. If You Have Kids in Car Seats

Car seats work best when the straps are snug against your child. Puffy jackets on top of extra winter layers can make a car seat less effective, exposing your child to more risk in the event of an accident. 

To avoid this, remove large overlayers before buckling them in. They can still wear a light jacket over a few smaller layers in their car seat. And you can keep a blanket in the car that you can place over the seatbelt. 

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2022 Black Friday Car Buying Guide

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2022 Black Friday Car Buying Guide

If you need a new car, Black Friday is as good a weekend as any to buy one. Here's Carmigo's ultimate car buying guide.

Carmigo’s Insider Guide to Getting the Best Deal on a Car this Black Friday.

Table of Contents

Save Even More When You Buy (Or Sell) on Black Friday

If you need a new car, Black Friday is as good a weekend as any to buy one — other than the crowds. And this car buying guide will help you plan ahead to get the best deal. 

Most car dealerships run sales that often stack on top of the monthly promotions and holiday promotions offered by manufacturers. You may even be able to skip the down payment or lock in a lower interest rate. 

But if you don’t prepare before shopping, you may spend more even after all the discounts. 

What Is This Car Buying Guide? 

We’ll walk you through the steps of buying a car the way we would do it. And since most of us have worked in and around car dealerships for most of our careers, we have some inside knowledge. 

To assemble this car buying guide, we talked to the experts at Carmigo, summarized the current market conditions, and even sat down for a Q&A with our Inside Sales Representative. 

This Black Friday weekend, we’ll waive our $350 sell fee. That’s right, we’ll help you sell your car for free. 

Fall 2022 Market Report

the used car market is down, but still higher

This summer, car dealerships and private sellers sold cars for all-time record prices. It was almost impossible to buy an affordable car. But at the same time, it was easier than ever to sell a car and walk away with plenty of money. 

Every peak has a fall, and this fall, we’re seeing vehicle prices going down this fall. Private vehicle owners are more reluctant to part with the vehicles at lower prices, but dealerships are no longer having to charge more for waitlisted vehicles. 

So if you’re buying a car soon, this fall is as good a time as any, and since the used car market is so much slower than it was this summer, you may get an even better deal than usual if you buy used. Follow the steps in this car buying guide to make sure you get the most out of your purchase

Sell Now if You’re Selling

If you plan to buy a car in winter, it might be worth your while to try to sell your old one sooner. 

If current trends hold, used cars will continue to sell for lower prices for the remainder of the year before leveling out. 

Similarly, new cars are in higher supply and selling much closer to MSRP than this summer. So selling now could be the difference of a thousand bucks (but that’s just our best guess). 

Sell For Free Black Friday Weekend

Complete your vehicle profile on the Carmigo marketplace from November 24 until November 27, and we’ll waive Carmigo’s $350 sell fee when it sells. 

There is no commitment to sell or even list your car, but we’re only turning off the sell-fee Black Friday weekend, so go ahead and complete your profile just in case. All you have to do is take a few pictures, answer a few questions, and set a minimum price. 

Then, if you decide to sell it on the marketplace, we’ll waive the sell fee. 

Get started at Carmigo.io.

Buying A Car? Don’t Do It Until You’ve Done These Eight Things.

buying a car is tough, but these eight tips will help.

When you buy a car, you’ve got to make what feels like 100 decisions before you even get to the dealership. And then you’re so worried you’re not getting a good deal that you start making knee-jerk decisions.

Buying a car is overwhelming. But with a bit of pre-purchase prep, the process can be much easier (and cheaper).

1. Get Pre-Approved and Set a Budget Before Buying a Car

Starting with a budget is such an obvious step in buying a car that it often gets overlooked. Knowing what you can afford will determine the type of car you buy and the dealership or private seller you buy it from.

You can sit down with your bank statements and figure out what you can afford or apply for a pre-approved loan from your bank. Banks typically don’t want to lend out more than their customers can afford, so they’ll give you a ballpark estimate. 

Once you have a price range, you can better understand what makes and models you can afford and which dealerships will be the best fit. 

2. Start With Your Need / Not Your Want

Carmigo’s Inside Sales Representative, Dylan, says starting with your need will save a lot of hassle later on and probably save you money. 

“Ask yourself what you’re really going to use this car for. Are you traveling a bunch for work? Do you need a truck to pull a horse trailer? Are you driving a bunch of kids around?”

Don’t buy a brand new small car if you’re planning on having more children. Go for a minivan. 

Don’t buy an SUV or a truck if you’re commuting and already on a tight budget. 

Cars are typically long-term purchases. Plan your purchase with the next five years in mind. 

3. Research the Cars 

Now that you know your budget and body type, it’s time to narrow down the models, decide whether to buy new or used ones, and pencil in some expected prices. 

Most models are similar when sorted by body type. The Honda Civic and Hyundai Elantra achieve a similar purpose. 

The same goes for makes. Toyotas have similar add-ons, pricing structures, and technology across models. Hondas are similar to Hondas, Fords are similar to Fords. 

So as you think more about what you need in a car, find the make, model, and body type combinations you like best. You may like how it feels to drive a CR-V but prefer a Toyota crossover’s technology and luxury upgrades. 

Since the CR-V and Rav4 are relatively equal in this example, price, availability, and dealership could become factors when buying a car.

4. Know the MSRP and the Market

Every new car has a sticker price (manufacturer-suggested retail price or MSRP), and every used car has a Kelley Blue Book Value, but that’s not always the whole story. 

A new Camry may retail at $25,845, but if there are supply issues, you can expect to pay more. However, if sales are slow, you may be able to get a new Camry for $23,000. 

Find out how much money cars are being listed for compared to how much they’re actually selling for. 

5. Research the Dealerships

All dealerships seem pretty similar on the surface, so it’s hard to know which to choose when buying a car. They’ll sell you a vehicle. They probably all have some used cars. They’re all trying to make some margin on the sale to pay the bills, and most of them have lots of experience processing all the paperwork and service issues. 

But it’s still a five-figure decision, so you want to ensure you buy a car from someone you trust. 

Here’s what Dylan says: “Find someone that you know isn’t going to pressure you to make a knee-jerk decision to buy a vehicle you don’t want or can’t afford.”

Search dealerships in your area that carry the models you’re interested in and have good reputations. Consider which ones have highly-rated service departments, especially if you’re buying a new car. 

6. Research Trims and Add-Ons Ahead of Time

Most sellers will try to get every dollar they can for extra investments they’ve made in the car. And they should. But don’t take their word for how much you should pay. 

Before you go to the dealership, you should know that each model has a variety of add-ons and features that can create $20,000+ differences in how much a car costs. 

For instance, an entry-level F150 is about $33,000, while the fully-maxed-out F150 Limited costs $5,000. Figure out where your needs fall within that range. 

And then there are added warranties, floor mats, and better wheels or tires. Most of those things can be purchased later. Make sure you know how much those things cost before buying a car. You’ll probably be overwhelmed with decisions and paperwork that day. You don’t want a stressful decision to be the difference of a few hundred extra dollars on your monthly payment. 

7. Read the Vehicle History Before Buying a Car

If you’re buying a car that’s been used before, it’s key to check the vehicle’s history report. Carfax is the most common vehicle history report brand. 

It will show you if the previous owners have maintained the vehicle over the years and note any wrecks or damage. 

8. Sell Your Old Car

The hardest part about buying a new car is selling your old one. You basically have three options, each with its pros and cons:

Private Sales can sometimes bring in a little bit more money but require the seller to do all the paperwork, handle negotiations with strangers, and advertise the sale. This often comes with fielding lots of calls from people who already know they will not buy your car. 

Dealerships Trade Ins are one of the easiest ways to sell your car. But (and this is a big but), dealership trade-ins often fetch the lowest price. 

Online car sales have taken off in recent years. Carmax and Carvana are two notable online buyers. The issue with each is that it’s one company making one off on your car based on that one company’s needs. 

Carmigo is a more decentralized online option for selling your car. With the Carmigo marketplace, you can list your car to a network of more than 100 buyers around the country. Carmigo listings typically get multiple offers in as little as one day.  

This Black Friday weekend, we’ll waive our $350 sell fee. That’s right, we’ll help you sell your car for free. 

How To Buy A Car: From An Industry Insider

how to buy a car Q&A

Carmigo’s Inside Sales Representative, Dylan, knows how to buy a car because he’s seen car sales from all sides. We asked him for the scoop, and here’s how he would shop:

Read the entire How to Sell Your Car Q&A here.

What questions should I be asked before I start shopping?

It’s easy to think about the cars we want, but to get the most value out of your purchase, start with the need:

  • Are you traveling for work? 
  • Do you need a truck to pull horse trailers? 
  • Are you driving kids to practice?

How important is the dealership?

You want to find a dealer that’s got a good reputation. When you’re spending this much money, it’s important to find someone you trust. You don’t want to go to a dealership you’re unsure about. And while most dealerships are great, it’s working with someone you trust will be less stressful. The less stress you have, the more clearly you can think. 

Does the individual salesperson make a difference in how to buy a car?

The salesperson is the go-between for you and the sales managers. Obviously, the sales managers are the ones that are setting prices. But your salesperson is going to be an important part of the process. So you want someone you know isn’t going to pressure you to make a knee-jerk decision to buy a vehicle you don’t want or can’t afford. 

What if I show up to a lot and the dealership doesn’t feel like the right fit?

Most salespeople know everybody at the other local dealerships. So there’s something that they may not have you can get at another lot.   They may say, “Hey, go see so-and-so across the street. They’ll take care of you.” Obviously, they want to make the sale. But if they can’t make the sale, they can refer you to someone that they know who will take care of you and help you find what you want.

Why does MSRP matter?

MSRP is the manufacturer suggested retail price. Because of the car market, most dealers are adding an addendum to that. So they’re not going off the MSRP and adding an additional cost. 

When it was hard to get inventory this summer, it cost more to transport parts and vehicles, so they were marking the price up to adjust to market prices at that time.

But take, for instance, trucks: The dealers might put some different wheels, tires, and lift kits on there. So having an addendum for that may be something other than a market adjustment. It may just be for those accessories they put on the vehicle. 

In a tight market, you might pay over MRSP. In a market with availability, you may pay under. Dealerships don’t have to make as much money on each sale if they’re selling 40 versus 10. 

How much does the dealership make?

Most reputable dealers are not there to make a ton of money off of you. They’re going to want to make a little bit of money, but the average is going to be around $1,500 to $2,000. They’re not there to make 10-15 thousand dollars like many people think. But they still have to pay for the vehicle.

Should I buy a used car directly from the owner?

A private party sale has some benefits. The main benefit is that you could get the vehicle a little cheaper just because a private party will not have the overhead a dealership has. 

But you take a lot of risk with a private party. They may not be truthful about the vehicle’s condition, mechanically or cosmetically. You may not be able to ask for a carfax history report — to see if they take the vehicle has been in a wreck. 

If you ask for a dealership, a dealership can provide that for you. 

And a dealership, once they get the car in, runs it through the service department, and they fix the issues that are wrong with the vehicle before they put it out on the lot to resell it.

Plus, there’s the aspect of titles. If you don’t buy and sell cars daily, you may not know how to handle titles and loan paperwork. When you go to a dealership, they’re taking care of all the paperwork for you versus a private party where you will have to call around and jump through hoops to get that title corrected.

And then you’re taking the risk of simply meeting a stranger, which can be stressful or even unsafe.

When you buy a car, what steps do you take?

  1. The first thing I do is figure out my need for the vehicle. Right now, my need for a car is to have something that gets good gas mileage since I’m traveling for work. So, My initial reaction would be to look at fuel-efficient vehicles. 
  2. I’ll do a little research on that to find out what specific makes or models I may want to look at.
  3. Then, I would research the dealership. If I know I want a Honda Accord, I will look for a Honda dealer. I’m going to read reviews. I’m going to look at their inventory. 
  4. Next, I’ll go by their lots just to see how they keep their vehicles looking. 
  5. Finally, once I figure out the vehicle and the dealership I want to use, I will go to the dealership to try to work a deal out with them.

If You’re Buying, You’re Probably Selling

The hardest part about buying a new car is selling your old one. 

Do you sell it yourself? Can you get a good trade-in offer at a dealership? Is it safe to sell it online?

Each option has its pros and cons:

Private Sales can sometimes bring in a little bit more money but require the seller to do all the paperwork, handle negotiations with strangers, and advertise the sale. This often comes with fielding lots of calls from people who already know they will not buy your car. 

Dealerships Trade Ins are one of the easiest ways to sell your car. But (and this is a big but), dealership trade-ins often fetch the lowest price. 

Online car sales have taken off in recent years. Carmax and Carvana are two notable online buyers. The issue with each is that it’s one company making one off on your car based on that one company’s needs. 

Carmigo is a more decentralized online option for selling your car. With the Carmigo marketplace, you can list your car to a network of more than 100 buyers around the country. Carmigo listings typically get multiple offers in as little as one day.  

The Easiest Way to Sell Your Car

If you’re thinking of selling privately or accepting a dealership’s trade-in offer, consider listing your car on the Carmigo marketplace first. There’s no obligation to sell unless the highest bid meets or beats your minimum price. 

You can complete a virtual inspection of your car in 15 minutes using the camera on your phone, and we’ll create a vehicle listing and distribute it with the inspection to our network. 

You can do it from anywhere, and we’ll handle the paperwork when it sells. Plus, we’ll pick it up. 

This Black Friday weekend, we’ll waive our $350 sell fee. That’s right, we’ll help you sell your car for free. 

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Buying a Car? Don’t Do It Until You’ve Done These Eight Things.

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Buying a Car? Don’t Do It Until You’ve Done These Eight Things.

Buying a car is pretty overwhelming. But with a little pre-purchase prep, the process can be a whole lot easier (and cheaper).

Here are Carmigo’s eight essential steps before buying a car.

Table of Contents

Buying a car is pretty overwhelming. You’ve got to make what feels like 100 decisions before you even get to the dealership. And then you’re so worried you’re not getting a good deal that you start making knee-jerk decisions.

But with a little pre-purchase prep, buying a car can be a whole lot easier. 

1. Get Pre-Approved and Set a Budget Before Buying a Car

Starting with a budget is such an obvious step in buying a car that it often gets overlooked. Knowing what you can afford will determine the type of car you buy and the dealership or private seller you buy it from.

You can sit down with your bank statements and figure out what you can afford or apply for a pre-approved loan from your bank. Banks typically don’t want to lend out more than their customers can afford, so they’ll give you a ballpark estimate. 

Once you have a price range, you can better understand what makes and models you can afford and which dealerships will be the best fit. 

2. Start With Your Need / Not Your Want

Carmigo’s Inside Sales Representative, Dylan, says starting with your need will save a lot of hassle later on and probably save you money. 

“Ask yourself what you’re really going to use this car for. Are you traveling a bunch for work? Do you need a truck to pull a horse trailer? Are you driving a bunch of kids around?”

Don’t buy a brand new small car if you’re planning on having more children. Go for a minivan. 

Don’t buy an SUV or a truck if you’re commuting and already on a tight budget. 

Cars are typically long-term purchases, so choose the vehicle/body type with the next five years in mind (i.e., small truck, Crossover EV, minivan, etc.).

car marketplace icon3. Research the Cars 

Now that you know your budget and body type, it’s time to narrow down the models, decide whether to buy new or used ones and pencil in some expected prices. 

Most models are pretty similar when sorted by body type. The Honda Civic and Hyundai Elantra achieve a similar purpose. 

The same goes for makes. Toyotas have similar add-ons, pricing structures, and technology across models. Hondas are similar to Hondas, Fords are similar to Fords. 

So as you think more about what you need in a car, find the make, model, and body type combinations you like best. Maybe you like how it feels to drive a CR-V but prefer the technology and luxury upgrades of a Toyota crossover. 

Since the CR-V and Rav4 are relatively equal in this example, price, availability, and dealership could become factors when buying a car.

4. Know the MSRP and the Market

Every new car has a sticker price (manufacturer-suggested retail price or MSRP), and every used car has a Kelley Blue Book Value, but that’s not always the whole story. 

A new Camry may retail at $25,845, but if there are supply issues, you can expect to pay more. However, if sales are slow, you may be able to get a new Camry for $23,000. 

Find out how much money cars are being listed for compared to how much they’re actually selling for. 

Carmax vs carmigo

5. Research the Dealerships

All dealerships seem pretty similar on the surface, so it’s hard to know which to choose when buying a car. They’ll sell you a vehicle. They probably all have some used cars. They’re all trying to make some margin on the sale to pay the bills, and most of them have lots of experience processing all the paperwork and service issues. 

But it’s still a five-figure decision, so you want to ensure you buy a car from someone you trust. 

Here’s what Dylan says: “Find someone that you know isn’t going to pressure you to make a knee-jerk decision to buy a vehicle you don’t want or can’t afford.”

Search dealerships in your area that carry the models you’re interested in and have good reputations. Consider which ones have highly-rated service departments, especially if you’re buying a car new. 

6. Research Trims and Add-Ons Ahead of Time

Most sellers will try to get every dollar they can for extra investments they’ve made in the car. And they should. But don’t take their word for how much you should pay. 

Before you go to the dealership, you should know that each model has a variety of add-ons and features that can create $20,000+ differences in how much a car costs. 

For instance, an entry-level F150 is about $33,000, while the fully-maxed-out F150 Limited costs $5,000. Figure out where your needs fall within that range. 

And then there are added warranties, floor mats, and better wheels or tires. Most of those things can be purchased later. Make sure you know how much those things cost before buying a car. You’ll probably be overwhelmed with decisions and paperwork that day. You don’t want a stressful decision to be the difference of a few hundred extra dollars on your monthly payment. 

7. Read the Vehicle History Before Buying a Car

If you’re buying a car that’s been used before, it’s key to check the vehicle’s history report. Carfax is the most common vehicle history report brand. 

It will show you if the previous owners have maintained the vehicle over the years and note any wrecks or damage. 

8. Sell Your Old Car

When you’re trying to figure out how to buy a car, you’re usually trying to figure out how to sell a car too. The hardest part about buying a new car is selling your old one.

Yes. You can absolutely sell your car to a dealership. In fact, it’s one of the easiest ways to sell your car. But (and this is a big but), dealership trade-ins often fetch the lowest price.

The extensive network of buyers with diverse vehicle needs on the Carmigo Marketplace means you can get multiple offers from buyers all over the country in as little as one business day.

So if you’re considering selling, think about listing your car on the Carmigo marketplace for a day before accepting a trade-in offer.

You can complete a virtual inspection of your car in 15 minutes using the camera on your phone, and we’ll create a vehicle listing and distribute it with the inspection to our network. 

You can do it from anywhere, and we’ll handle the paperwork when it sells. Plus, we’ll pick it up—all for a flat rate of $350, which comes from the final sale price. 

Start Getting Offers on Your Car Today

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How to Buy a Car: Carmigo’s Q&A With an Industry Insider

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How to Buy a Car: Carmigo’s Q&A With an Industry Insider

Carmigo's Inside Sales Representative knows how to buy a car because he's seen car sales from all sides. Here’s how an insider shops for cars.

Dylan Richey has seen car sales from all sides. Here’s how he shops for cars

Table of Contents

Carmigo’s Inside Sales Representative Dylan Richey has been in and around dealerships his whole career, so he’s seen the process from just about every angle process. 

We sat down with him this week to talk about how to buy a car as we head into this holiday season. 

learn how to buy a car like these hipsters

How to buy a car.

JB: What are the questions you need to be thinking about when shopping for a new car?

Dylan:  Well, really, you need to know what your need is for the car. 

  • Are you traveling for work? 
  • Do you need a truck to pull horse trailers or something like that? 

Then, I would say your budget would be the most important thing. Depending on your budget that’s also going to determine if you would want to buy a new or used car. 

How Important is the Dealership?

JB: And then how important is the dealership? Like, can you go to anyone? Are they about the same?

Dylan: So you want to find a dealer that’s got a good reputation. And you can do that by looking at Facebook and Google reviews. Or just word of mouth — asking around to friends and stuff. But you want to go to one that you can trust. You don’t want to go to a dealership you’re unsure about.

JB: Yeah, I mean it’s usually a five-figure decision, right? 

Dylan:  Well, for sure.

the individual sales person has some impact on how to buy a car

Does the individual salesperson make a difference in how to buy a car?

JB:  What about the individual salesperson when you get there? Do they have control over the sale or are they sort of a go-between?

Dylan: So the salesperson, they’re kind of the go-between with you and the sales managers. Which, obviously the sales managers are the ones that are setting prices. But your salesperson is going to be an important part of the process.  So you want someone you trust will take care of you.

Someone that you know isn’t going to pressure you to make a knee-jerk decision to buy a vehicle you don’t want or can’t afford. 

What if you show up to a lot and the dealership doesn’t feel like the right fit?

Dylan:  You may just mention something to the salesperson because sometimes the salesperson can kind of break the ice between you and the managers. But if it’s still not the right fit — if you have a feeling that it’s not right — I would suggest that you maybe look for a different dealership or do some more research to see if you know anyone that’s bought from that dealership and see how they felt about it.

Are most dealerships pretty willing to check with other dealerships to try and help you get the best deal?

Dylan: Yes. Most salespeople know everybody at the other local dealerships. So there’s something that they may not have you can get at another lot. 

They may say, “Hey go see so-and-so across the street, they’ll take care of you.” Obviously, they want to make the sale. But if they can’t make the sale they can refer you to someone that they know who will take care of you and help you find what you want.

what does MSRP have to do with how to buy a car

What about MSRP? Why is that a thing that we should know about? 

Dylan:  So the MSRP is the manufacturer-suggested retail price. So Toyota may recommend that the price should be twenty thousand dollars. Right now it’s kind of important. Because of the car market, most dealers are adding an addendum to that. So they’re not going off the MSRP. They’re adding an additional cost. It’s very important to look at that. To make sure you’re getting a good deal.

JB: I know this summer part of the reason that cars were above MSRP wasn’t necessarily because the dealership was trying to make more money but it was because it was costing $5,000 more to get the car to the lot. So is it important to not just know the number, but to know why the price you’re being offered is what it is?

Dylan: Yeah for sure it’s important to know that. When it was hard to get inventory or it costs more to transport the vehicle, whatever the reason was, they were marking it up to adjust to the market price at that time.

But take for instance trucks: The dealers might put some different wheels, tires, and lift kits on there. So having an addendum for that may not necessarily be a market adjustment. It may just be for those accessories they put on the vehicle. 

JB:  And so if you’re in a market where people aren’t buying as many cars, you might get a car under MSRP, Yeah.

Dylan:  They don’t have to make as much if they’re selling 40 versus 10.

How much does the dealership make?

JB:  A lot of folks are worried the dealers are making all kinds of money with a big markup. But to me, it kind of seems like there’s not a ton of margin.

Dylan: Most reputable dealers are not there to make a ton of money off of you. Obviously, they’re gonna want to make a little bit of money, but the average is gonna be around $1,500 to $2,000. They’re not there to make 10-15 thousand dollars like people think. But they still have to pay for the vehicle.

Dylan: And the way that the market is right now, they’re having to overpay for the vehicles on their lots. 

How to buy a car privately.

JB: So a lot of people are kind of nervous about going to the dealership. What are the benefits and risks of just buying a car privately?

Dylan: A private party sale has some benefits. The main benefit is that you could possibly get the vehicle a little cheaper just because a private party is not gonna have the overhead that a dealership has. 

But you take a lot of risk with a private party. They may not be truthful about the condition of the vehicle mechanically or cosmetically. You may not be able to ask for a carfax history report — see if they take the vehicle has been in a wreck. How can you verify that? If you ask for a dealership, a dealership can provide that for you. 

And then you’re taking the risk of just simply meeting a stranger. That can be unsafe. 

Plus then there’s the aspect of titles. If you don’t buy and sell cars every day, you may not know how to handle titles and loan paperwork and all that. When you go to a dealership, they’re taking care of all the paperwork for you versus a private party where you’re gonna have to call around and jump through hoops to try to get that title corrected or to even hope that you get the title.

JB:  I think one thing that kind of worries me about private is that these are people who probably wanted more money than what a dealer was willing to pay for it. And also maybe the dealership didn’t want it because it has issues. 

Dylan: People can go to the local parts stores and get them to turn a check engine light off. So, you don’t know. 

But a dealership, once they get the car in, they run them through the service department, and they fix the issues that are wrong with the vehicle before they put it out on the lot to resell it.

How to buy a car the expert way.

JB:  All right, so you’re buying a car. Walk us through — beginning to end. What do you do?

Dylan:  

  1. The first thing I do is figure out my need for the vehicle. Right now my need for a vehicle is to have something that gets good gas mileage since I’m traveling for work. So, My initial reaction would be to look at fuel-efficient vehicles. 
  2. I’ll do a little research on that to find out what specific makes or models I may want to look at.
  3. Then I would research the dealership. If I know that I want a Honda Accord. I’m gonna look for a Honda dealer. I’m gonna read reviews. I’m gonna look at their inventory. 
  4. Next, I’ll go by their lots just to see how they keep their vehicles looking. 
  5. Finally, once I figure out the vehicle and the dealership I want to use, I would go to the dealership to try to work a deal out with them.

JB: What about if I’m trying to decide between an Accord and a Camry? 

Dylan: If you want a new vehicle, you would have to go to a Toyota or Honda dealership, but if you’re looking at the used market, you can go to the used dealership. And most used dealerships are going to have tons of different makes and models that you can test drive. 

But a good suggestion, if you’re not sure, is to go to the used dealership test drive, a few — Toyota, Honda, Nissan, Lexus, whatever — and then decide. If you want to go with something newer, then you can go back to that new dealership. That way, you don’t have to travel so much and go in between so many dealerships.

JB: And I guess the dealerships that have more makes and models probably have some opinions based on what they sell and what they see come back to the service department.

Dylan: Right, most of them know of any common issues. So that’s good to ask about as well. You can learn a lot by doing that. 

JB:  All right. Well, thanks for sharing some expertise with us, man.

Dylan: Yeah, anytime

If You Buying, You’re Probably Selling

When you’re trying to figure out how to buy a car, you’re usually trying to figure out how to sell a car too. The hardest part about buying a new car is selling your old one. 

Yes. You can absolutely sell your car to a dealership. In fact, it’s one of the easiest ways to sell your car. But (and this is a big but), dealership trade-ins often fetch the lowest price. 

The large network of buyers with diverse vehicle needs on the Carmigo Marketplace means you can get multiple offers from buyers all over the country in as little as one business day.
 
So if you’re thinking about selling, think about listing your car on the Carmigo marketplace for a day before accepting a trade-in offer.
 
You can complete a virtual inspection of your car in 15 minutes using the camera on your phone, and we’ll create a vehicle listing and distribute it with the inspection to our network. 

You can do it from anywhere, and when it sells, we’ll handle the paperwork. Plus, we’ll pick it up. All for a flat rate of $350, which comes out of the final sale price. 

Start Getting Offers

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A Clean Car Sells for More

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A Clean Car Sells for More

Carmigo’s in-house mechanic, Troyal, is here to help you keep your car’s value up by keeping it clean and protecting it from the elements.

Keep Your Car Clean to Keep Your Car’s Value Up

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Carmigo’s in-house mechanic, Troyal, is here to help you keep your car’s value up by keeping it clean and protecting it from the elements.

Keep Your Car Clean

First thing first, a clean car sells for more. 

People like what they buy to be clean. That’s just the way it is. 

But a clean car also shows a potential buyer that your car has been well cared for. 

People who regularly wash and vacuum their cars also have them regularly serviced. Car owners who fix cosmetic issues also tend to fix mechanical problems. A clean car isn’t necessarily a better working or more valuable car, but it’s an assumption buyers are often willing to make.

Dirt Damage

Mother nature can do some actual damage to your car over time, so keeping a clean car not only maintains the car’s value but also prevents the negative financial impact of nature-caused damage. 

Dirt, pollen, and sap buildup can damage your car’s paint. Paint is more than cosmetic. It also serves as an additional protective layer for the car’s structural and mechanical materials. 

Additionally, the buildup of organic material like leaves, pine straw, and sap can ruin the rubber seals around your windows, doors, and sunroof.

What If I Don’t Have a Garage?

You can protect your car from most elements without a garage. 

The first step is to begin cleaning your car regularly, whether that means you spend a little time sudsing it up yourself and enjoying the sunshine or take it for a rinse at your local car wash. 

If you’re serious about keeping your car clean and protected, you can purchase a car cover at most auto parts stores to protect your car.

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Why Maintaining Service Records Increases Your Car’s Value

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Why Maintaining Service Records Increases Your Car’s Value

Our resident mechanic has tips for keeping value in your used car. Service records could be worth thousands of dollars when it’s time to sell.

Taking notes could be worth thousands of dollars when it’s time to sell your car.

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What Are Service Records?

Your car’s service record is simply an accounting of the history of your vehicle. In industry terms, your car’s service record typically refers to the information that would show up on a report like the ones issued by Carfax

The Carfax report includes an accounting of previous owners, accidents, major damage, repairs, and regular maintenance. 

But service records could also refer to that mess of mechanic receipts in your glove box (though that probably isn’t the best way to maintain your car’s service record, but more on that later).

How Do Service Records Raise Vehicle Value? 

It’s as simple as showing potential buyers that your car has been well taken care of over its lifespan. 

Which would you rather buy, a 2016 Toyota Corolla with 100,000 miles on it and zero oil changes, or a 2016 Toyota Corolla with 100,000 miles on it and quarterly oil changes? 

Can I Add Personal Maintenance to the Service Records?

If you’ve had regular maintenance (oil changes, tire rotations, realignment, etc.) performed at your local dealership, your vehicle history report will show it. Potential buyers like to see the car they are purchasing is well taken care of. 

Think about it like your credit score, but for your car. It’s real, it matters, and you can certainly find out what it probably is. 

Maintenance at other mechanics or maintenance you perform yourself won’t show up on that report. So it’s important to be sure to bring your car to a dealership at regular intervals. 

You can upload your own service records to Carfax. But buyers tend to lend more weight to maintenance performed at dealerships than in your own garage. 

Similarly, you can hand over all the receipts in your glove compartment (but straighten them out and put them in a folder first 😉). But a folder of wrinkled paper receipts is less effective since most buyers will want to pull an official report anyway. 

Can I Access My Car Service Records? 

You certainly can. Some places charge and some places don’t, but there are plenty of options online for pulling your vehicle’s service records. Carfax is the industry leader for vehicle history reports (and they allow you to update your records), but it’ll cost at least $40 to get a report. 

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Gas Prices and Inflation Are Down, for Now

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Gas Prices and Inflation Are Down, for Now

August is the most normal the US economy has been in years. But what does that even mean? Inflation has slowed and gas prices are lower.

August 2022 Market Watch

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August 2022 Inflation line graph

August is the most normal the US economy has been in years. But what does that even mean? 

Well, inflation has slowed down (a little), and gas prices are much lower than they were a few months ago. At the same time, new car production is ticking back up, and used car prices are starting to normalize. 

Inflation Slowed More Than Expected 

August 2022 Inflation line graph

At the time of publication, inflation in the US economy slowed. In fact, the inflation rate was lower than it’s been since the spring.

Quick Definition: Inflation is the gradual increase in prices and/or gradual reduction in the value of a currency. So the inflation rate is the rate at which prices increase.

So the slowing of the inflation rate means that the prices we’ve seen rising all around us are beginning to normalize again. 

Lower inflation means lower prices, which is good for almost all American consumers. But if you’re selling a car, it could mean a slightly lower price for you. 

Inflation is almost always going up but at a low and consistent rate. According to the US Bureau of Labor Statistics, inflation increased by more than 9% in June, nearly double the rate from a year ago. But in July, inflation was down to 8.5%. 

Following the passage of the Inflation Reduction Act, we can expect to see continued decreases, though an immediate return to 5% is unlikely. 

Gas Prices on Their Way Down

August 2022 gas prices

The great gas price hike of 2022 may finally be over. Gas Prices are finally dropping after reaching all-time highs.

Last week the average national regular gas price dropped below $4 per gallon for the first time since March, according to AAA. As of publication, the average price of a gallon of regular gas is 3.943, down seven cents from last week and nearly 60 cents from a month ago. But that’s still more than 75 cents higher than last year. 

Even With Prices Falling, Americans Are Driving Less

Gas prices are going down but Americans are still driving less.

A survey by AAA found drivers are changing their driving habits to keep their gas consumption in line with their budget. More than 60 percent of US adults have already made changes since the historic rise in gas prices began this spring. 

New Car Production Steady, Inventory Up

New car production has finally had time to begin catching up following pandemic production shortages. 

According to the Cox Automotive monthly industry update, new vehicle inventory is up 2% over last year. That’s 20,000 more vehicles on the lot. While this is only a drop in the bucket, increased supply will eventually lead to price normalization, which we’re already beginning to see in used car sales. 

Used Car Prices Normalize

The Cox Automotive report contains the headline: “Used Prices Back to Depreciation.” That means used cars are finally selling for less than their new car sticker price. 

But the listing price for used cars is still 11% higher than last year. 

That means many sellers are trying to sell used cars for more than buyers are willing to pay. 

The trend seems to be on the buyers’ side, but we’ll have to wait and see how it plays out. 

The Manheim Used Vehicle Value Index has wholesale used vehicle prices down 3.6% from July to August but still more than 6% higher than a year ago. 

We expect used car prices will continue to drop. But remember, used car prices are still at an all-time high. 

New EV Tax Credits

The Inflation Reduction Act expands the current EV Tax Credits as a part of lowering the demand for gas and overall inflation.

Getting an EV tax credit might seem a little confusing on the surface. But with a little research, the help of a good car salesman, and some patience during tax season, you could get up to $7,500 back on your federal taxes. 

The new Inflation Reduction Act also opens up the EV tax credit to Americans purchasing used EVs. The Congressional Budget Office has reported nearly 25,000 used EVs will qualify for up to $4,000 in tax credit in 2023.

If you’ve been on the fence about an EV purchase, now is the time to take advantage of federal funds. When you file, you will start saving on gas immediately, and up to $7,500 will be added to your final tax return (or subtracted from your bill). You can put that toward anything, but if you put it toward your car, you’ll be looking at lower monthly payments and reduced maintenance and fuel costs.

What’s All This Mean For You?

Well, you should certainly be saving money on gas. And as inflation continues to slow, prices will hopefully go down on a lot of the stuff you buy. 

But if you’re trying to sell a used car, we may be at the tail end of a historic price peak. That doesn’t mean you’ll lose all the value you have in your car if you sell it later. It just means you may miss out on record used-car price highs. 

Are you thinking of selling your car now? Give Carmigo a shot. We make it super easy to sell your car. You can build your car’s listing in less than 15 minutes, and we can start getting offers from our network of dealerships in as little as one business day. 

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How The Inflation Reduction Act Could Get You a $7,500 EV Tax Credit

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How The Inflation Reduction Act Could Get You a $7,500 EV Tax Credit

The EV tax credit in the new Inflation Reduction Act is designed to increase the adoption of electric vehicles while lowering gas prices.

Inflation is in every headline, but what does it mean for you?

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The EV tax credits in the new Inflation Reduction Act are designed to increase the adoption of electric vehicles while lowering fuel demand (and prices).

At the time of publication, inflation in the US economy slowed. In fact, the inflation rate was lower than it’s been since the spring.

Inflation is the gradual increase in prices and/or gradual reduction in the value of a currency. So the inflation rate is the rate at which prices increase.

So the slowing of the inflation rate means that the prices we’ve seen rising all around us are beginning to normalize again. This is certainly a good sign for the American consumer. 

What Does Inflation Have to Do with EVs?

As a part of reducing prices, the Inflation Reduction Act aims to decrease the fastest growing prices, which include gas. 

The more of a gas (or anything) that’s available in a market, the less expensive it will be. If demand for gas goes down, so will the price. Similarly, if supply goes, the price will go down. 

This new law will also work to reduce demand by incentivizing American drivers to purchase electric vehicles through tax credits. 

How Do I Get an EV Tax Credit? 

Getting an EV tax credit might seem a little confusing on the surface. But with a little research and patience, you could get up to $7,500 back on your federal taxes. 

The tax credit is an extension of a previously existing credit. One important change is that all new qualifying vehicles must be assembled in North America. 

You can find out if the car you’re thinking of purchasing was assembled in North America using this VIN Decoder from the US Department of Transportation. 

After purchasing a qualifying vehicle, be sure to keep your documents in a safe place until tax season. When you fill out your taxes, remember to let your accountant, tax filer, or TurboTax know about your purchase.

A consumer reports survey showed that more than 50% of buyers are more likely to buy an electric vehicle if it comes with a hefty tax credit. 

Which Vehicles Qualify for an EV Tax Credit?

The US Department of Energy maintains a list of vehicles that currently qualify for the tax credit. But, the old EV tax credit law maintained a cap for how many credits could be issued to each manufacturer, so be sure you aren’t buying a car from a manufacturer that’s already met it’s cap for the year. Or wait until January when those caps roll off. 

This tax credit is only available to US families that make less than $300,000, but that means something like 90% of US households qualify. 

The EV Tax Credit Is for Used Cars Too

The new Inflation Reduction Act also opens up the EV tax credit to Americans purchasing used EVs.

This is a first-time tax credit that may be worth waiting until January for if you’re in the market for a used car.  

Any household that makes less than $150,000 or individual who makes under $75,000 qualifies for a tax credit equal to $4,000 or 30 percent of the sale price (depending on which is lower). 

The Congressional Budget Office has reported nearly 25,000 used EVs will qualify for up to $4,000 in tax credit in 2023.

Used EV purchasers don’t have to worry about the North American assembly requirement, but will have to purchase the EV from a dealership to qualify. 

Make the Switch and Save With an EV Tax Credit

If you’ve been on the fence about an EV purchase, now is the time to take advantage of federal funds. You will start saving on gas immediately, and up to $7,500 will be added to your final tax return (or subtracted from your bill) when you file. You can put that toward anything, but if you put it toward your car you’ll be looking at lower monthly payments and reduced maintenance and fuel costs.

EV PRICES ARTICLE

When you decide to make the switch, list your car on Carmigo. 

It’s the easiest way to sell your car, and you can do it all from the comfort of your phone without ever leaving your home. We legit had two people list their cars while pumping gas last week. 

List your car in as few as 15 minutes, and sell it in as little as one business day. 

When you decide to make the switch, list your car on Carmigo. 

It’s the easiest way to sell your car, and you can do it all from the comfort of your phone without ever leaving your home. We legit had two people list their cars while pumping gas last week. 

List your car in as few as 15 minutes, and sell it in as little as one business day. 

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Carmigo Vs. the Competition

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Carmigo Vs. the Competition

Before you try to sell your car to one national retailer, see how Carmigo stacks up — Carmigo vs the competition.

When You Sell to One Dealer, You Get the Lowest Offer

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Carmigo is the latest in a series of companies that have innovated the car-selling process, but is it better than the sales platforms that came before? We think so, but decide for yourself — Carmigo vs the competition. 

Carmigo took the online selling format and added the opportunity for car owners to participate in a larger wholesale-style marketplace with a network of participating buyers. 

It sounds complicated, but here’s a quick breakdown of why that’s better. 

Carmigo vs the Competition 

  • Carvana
    • Simple Online Process
    • Those Cool Elevators
    • One Offer, No Explanation 
    • Carvana Controls the Transaction
  • CarMax
    • Simple Process
    • Efficient Trade-In System
    • Lower Offers
    • In-Person Inspection Required
  • Kelley Blue Book Instant Cash Offer
    • Quick Estimate
    • In-Person Inspection Required
    • Offer expires
  • Carmigo
    • 15-Minute Digital Inspection
    • Sell in as little as a day
    • Competitive Offers
    • No Paperwork
    • No Driving

You're selling your car from your phone, so let's pit CarMax vs Carmigo, and Carmigo vs the competition.

Selling Your Car is Easier Than Ever

Carmax, Carvana, and Kelley Blue Book have all made it easier to sell your car. Thanks to those companies, you can spend a lot less time advertising your car in the newspaper and online marketplaces. And you don’t have to haggle with strangers either.

But at Carmigo, we think we’ve made selling your car even easier. 

With Carmigo, you can list your car to our network of dealerships in 15 minutes or less. Those dealerships then compete for your car in a one-day marketplace, so you get offers and you get them fast.

Instead of getting one offer from one dealership, you find out the highest price dealerships all over the country are willing to pay. And the dealerships who need your car might even engage in a bidding war, driving the price higher with each new offer. 

This process creates a fair-market offer for your car, instead of an offer based on the needs of one national retailer like Carmax and Carvana.

Read more about how Carmigo stacks up against each of these national car-selling platforms: 

Carmigo Makes it Seriously Easy to Sell Your Car

We’re not going to tell you we’re perfect, but we’re honestly trying to build the easiest, fairest car selling experience on the internet.  So read some of our reviews, good and bad (and there are way more good than bad).

Carmigo vs the competition

Who Wins? Carmigo vs the Competition

There is nothing wrong with selling a car to CarMax. The company has done a lot of innovation in the online car sales space and has locations in every metro area.  But, just because CarMax is a good way to sell your car doesn’t mean it’s the best way to sell it. In fact, you’ll probably be leaving money on the table. 

Get more money with Carmigo

CarMax and Carvana each offer you one offer for your vehicle. That means the offer is based on their national inventory needs. And they have access to cars from all over the country. What happens when we pit Carmigo vs the competition?

But Carmigo is a platform that connects you to multiple retailers, offering you multiple offers. Which would you rather have? One offer for your car, or multiple? Carmigo has dealerships across multiple states actively competing for cars just like yours. These dealerships are already competing through closed auctions across the country. But now, Carmigo is giving you direct access to list your vehicle in a similar-style marketplace platform allowing dealerships to compete with each other for your car. Plus it’s all done through your phone. How cool is that? Choose Carmigo to sell your car; you won’t regret it.

The easy way to sell your car

At Carmigo, the process is even easier. All you have to do is give us your vehicle’s basic information and snap a few guided photos to build your vehicle listing.  Then, just sit back, relax, and watch in real-time as offers come in for your vehicle. After your car sells, we handle all the paperwork, transfers, and transportation. We do all the work, so you don’t have to. Yeah, we really just made selling your vehicle that easy. And we will get you more money for your car. Try Carmigo today and see what real, hassle-free happiness is all about.

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